H.Upmann Magnum 46 (2008) Wednesday, Jan 19 2011 

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Country: Cuba
Size: Corona Gorda 5.6″ x 46 ring

Follow along here and I think I can describe to you in a meaningful way what smoking this cigar tasted like.  Imagine you brewed a nice robust pot of Antigua Guatemalan coffee.  Next you lighten it with some half and half and then to top it off you put just a dash of Romana Sambuca in it. Now take a big swallow of that coffee and and imagine what the lingering finish of that swallow tastes like.  Next remove that slight bit of sweetness that the Sambuca gives it…

There you have this cigar.  A subtle bit of earthiness with strong flavors of coffee and cream and hint of anise.  It was smooth, creamy and perfect from start to finish.  The burn and draw were perfect.  The ash was perfect.  This cigar was perfect, like smoking a cup of coffee.

Cohiba Coronas Especiales Thursday, Dec 16 2010 

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Country: Cuba
Size: Panetela 6.0″ x 38 ring

This was a gift I received a few years ago from one of the best BOTL’s on the planet.  AndyMiami is one of the most genuinely generous people on the planet.  He’s a good cook to boot.  Just check out his blog Andy’s Diner and you’ll see what I mean.  Just a friendly warning, don’t look at it while you’re hungry. I decided I have held onto this stick long enough and it is time to enjoy it with a nice glass of Zaya Rum to sip on.  Andy sent me this back in January of 2007 so this stick is at least 4 years old at this point so I figure it is probably ready.

The cigar is beautiful.  Cohiba’s seem to have a unique shade of light brown that no other cigar seems to duplicate.  It is topped with a small pig tail and dressed in the Cohiba band, it looks the part of an elegant and expensive cigar.    After clipping off the pigtail I took a test draw and predictably it was a little tight.  I find a tight draw to be very common with Cuban cigars.  It is annoying to me really, but this one wasn’t so bad as to cause me any issue.  It starts off better than any cigar I can think of.   Right off the bat the flavors are smooth and creamy with slightly sweet notes of vanilla and honey perfectly balanced with subtle brine and that classic Cuban twang.  During the course of the smoke I also picked up on coffee notes, as well as toasted bread and some occasional burst of pepper near the end.  The last third of the smoke was very robust and the strength of the cigar just continued to build and by the end it was quite a strong smoke.  The cigar was very complex and I enjoyed the way it built up in strength and body, starting out with creamy somewhat mild flavors and gradually transitioning into the more robust and earthy flavors near the end.  This cigar was a real treat.  Thanks Andy.  You ‘da man.

5th Anniversary Review: Cohiba Robusto Reserva (2003) Wednesday, Jun 23 2010 

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Country: Cuba

Today my humble little blog turns a whopping 5 years old. In internet years that is old. Sites on the internet come and go like leaves in the wind and it seems to be especially true of cigar related blogs. Considering that, I am rather proud of my little corner of the internet and how long it has managed to hang on, or more accurately perhaps; how long I have managed to hang on and stay committed to keeping this thing going. So today I celebrate 5 years of cigar reviews and mediocre writing with a very special smoke that my readers helped me to pick. During the first half of June I posted a poll asking my readers to help me decide which cigar I should review to mark this special milestone. There were 5 stellar cigars to choose from and in the end the Tatuaje Reserva SW Maduro was just barely edged out by an equally special Cohiba Robusto Reserva from 2003. So here we go, to celebrate Matt’s Cigar Journal’s 5 Year Anniversary, I give you the Cohiba Robusto Reserva…

In 2003 Habanos, SA release a special edition box of Cohiba cigars.  It was the Cohiba Selección Reserva and it contained 30 cigars in an assortment of sizes including six robusto sized cigars.  To see photos and get all the vital statistic of the cigars that came in this box check out the Cuban Cigar Website by clicking here.  I find it a very useful reference for information on Cuban cigars.  My sample was very generously given to me by Brother of the Leaf who happened to own a bar in Denmark.  I had always hoped to make it over there and check out his bar and smoke a cigar with him but as it happens we have lost touch and I am not sure where he is anymore.  I have been saving this very special cigar for a special occasion and I am happy to be finally putting it to flame in celebration of 5 years of blogging about my passion for fine hand made cigars.

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This Cohiba has a very classic looking wrapper like light brown leather.  It is adorned with a normal Cohiba band and a second black and gold band displaying the Reserva designation.  The draw is absolutely perfect.  I used Gordon Mott’s  “Three Match Technique” to get the cigar lit.  Right from the very start this cigar is smooth and buttery.  There were creamy notes of vanilla and hint of citrus with a nice floral aroma.  It wasn’t long before it starts to change up.  The flavors became woody and leathery with a bit of spice and I started to get a bit of salt and pepper on the lips.  The aroma is still very floral.  Underneath it all is that classic Cuban earthiness and twang.  Half way through and this is already one of the most amazing cigars I have smoked.  There are flavors I can’t even figure out how to identify.  As I made my way through the smoke the cigar kept changing.  there were flavors of coffee, nuts, vanilla, honey, fruit, leather, and more.   There was lots of that Cuban earthiness mixed in as well and the cigar went from sweet to spicy and back to sweet, the flavors always smooth and creamy on the palate.  The flavors were full and rich but never overpowering and it had only a mild nicotine punch.  The cigar was an absolute joy to smoke from start to finish.  I can’t imagine a better choice of cigar to celebrate my blogs 5 Year Anniversary.

Cohiba Siglo I Tuesday, Jun 23 2009 

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Country: Cuba
Size: Très Petit Corona 4.0″ x 40 ring

Cohiba is one of the most famous cigar brands in the world.  Thanks to the United States trade embargo with Cuba and General Cigar’s appropriation of the trademark in the US market, it is also a brand name surrounded by a lot of confusion.  There are a surprising number of people out there including some who consider themselves “cigar smokers” that fail to understand that the famous Cohiba, the Cuban version, in no way shape or form is related to or similar to the Cohiba that is for Sale in the US.  The matter gets even more muddled when you bring into the conversation the other company that was making Dominican Cohibas.  I believe this third company was called “Cohiba Caribbean’s Finest Cigars”.  The cigar bands on this company’s version of the cigar more closely resembled the famous Cuban cigar band whereas General Cigar’s Cohiba band is very different.  General’s Cohiba is commonly referred to as “Red Dot” due to the red dot that fills the letter “O” in Cohiba on their bands. General Cigar sued Cohiba Caribbean over the Cohiba name and won.  Cohiba Caribbean was ordered to stop sales and production of their version of the Cohiba cigar.  To take the story to Soap Opera proportions, Cubatobacco, the Cuban company that owns the original and some would say “real” Cohiba brand has sued General Cigar over the trademark and is seeking to had the courts stop them from branding and selling cigars with the Cohiba name.  That suit has gone back and forth for a while and as far as I know is still ongoing.  I did see an interesting post about it on The Stogie Guys’ website that linked to an actual court opinion that had ruled in favor of Cubatobacco.  General had planned to appeal.  I don’t know where that battle stands today but I assume it is still on going.  What all this drama boils down to is this…Your Dominican “Red Dot” Cohiba has nothing to do with the famous Cohiba brand.  It just happens to bear the same name.  Other than that the Dominican Cohiba probably has more in common with a Macanudo.

I will refrain from delving deeper into the origins of Cohiba but I do want to take a moment to share some information on the Siglo line, because after all, eventually I’ll get to talking about the cigar I smoked which was a Cohiba Siglo I.  I’ll keep it short, mainly because I only know what Min Ron NEE tells me in his book, An Illustrated Encyclopedia of Post-Revolution Havana Cigars.  The Siglo Series was introduced in 1992.  According to MRN it is speculated that the line was created to fill the void left by the discontinuation of the Davidoff marca.  All of the Siglo line is reportedly milder than your standard Cohiba.  There is actually an italicized note from MRN saying that going over the draft of the book, his Cuban consultant that was working with him confirmed it is true that the line was created to fill that gap left by Davidoff.  I can say that while milder than a Cohiba Robusto, the Siglo I is not a mild cigar.  I have never had the pleasure of a Cuban Davidoff, so I have no personal knowledge of how the Siglos compare to the cigar they have replaced in the Habanos catalog.  The Siglo I comes in cardboard packs of 5 or 10, in 3 packs of tubos, and in varnished Slide Lid Boxes of 25 cigars.  The one I am smoking today was a gift from a very generous friend so I have no idea what type of packaging it spent the first part of its life in.

Lets start off with appearance.  The Siglo I is a très petit corona, or if you like to use the official Habanos, S.A. factory names for the vitolas, then you’d call it a perlas.  It measures a diminutive four inches in length and a thin 40 ring gauge.  The wrapper is a little darker than what I have seen on the standard Cohiba line and this specimen has a small water spot on the wrapper.  It sports a triple cap like all Cuban parejos do.  A little bumpy and rustic looking, it seems well filled and exhibited a nice firm draw before I lit it.  With eager anticipation I used the “Three Match” technique to get this cigar lit.  The technique is much easier on a smaller cigar like this than it is on a thicker robusto or a long double corona.  A few puffs in and I immediately realized my mistake.  I decided to light this cigar up much too early.  There were moments of harshness and a grassiness that told me this cigar could have used some time aging, probably a year or two at least to settle in.  You could definitely see this cigars potential to be stellar though.  There was an underlying creaminess to it and perhaps some notes of roasted nuts complimented by a vague hint of sweet tea.  Those flavors only occasional came through as the more vegetal and grassy flavors of youth dominated the smoke.  I really wish I had been more patient with this one.  I think once it has a chance to settle down this would be an very excellent medium bodied smoke.  Patience is a must though if you want to find that out.

Cohiba is one of the most famous cigar brands in the world.  Thanks to the United States trade embargo with Cuba and General Cigar’s appropriation

of the trademark in the US market, it is also a brand name surrounded by a lot of confusion.  There are a surprising number of people out there

including some who consider themselves “cigar smokers” that fail to uderstand that the famous Cohiba, the Cuban version, in no way shape or form is

related to or similar to the Cohiba that is for Sale in the US.  The matter gets even more muddled when you bring into the conversation the other

company that was making Dominican Cohibas.  I believe this third company was called “Cohiba Carribbean’s Finest Cigars”.  The cigar bands on this

company’s version of the cigar more closely resembled the famous Cuban cigar band whereas General Cigar’s Cohiba band is very different.  General’s

Cohiba is commonly referred to as “Red Dot” due to the red dot that fills the letter “O” in Cohiba on thier bands. General Cigar sued Cohiba

Carribbean over the Cohiba name and won.  Cohiba Carribean was ordered to stop saels and production of thier version of the Cohiba cigar.  To take

the story to Soap Opera proportions, Cubatobacco, the Cuban company that owns the origional and some would say “real” Cohiba brand has sued General

Cigar over the trademark and is seeking to had the courts stop them from branding and selling cigars with the Cohiba name.  That suit has gone back

and forth for a while and as far as I know is still ongoing.  I did see an interesting post about it on The Stogie Guys’ website that linked to an

actual court opinion that had ruled in favor of Cubatobacco.  General had planned to appeal.  I don’t know where that battle stands today but I

assume it is still on going.  What all this drama boils down to is this…Your Dominican COhiba has nothing to do with the famous Cohiba brand.  It

just happens to bear the same name.  Other than that you Dominican Cohiba probably has more in common with a Macanudo.

I will refrain from devling deeper into the origins of Cohiba but I do want to take a moment to share some information on the Siglo line, because

afterall, eventually I’ll get to talking about the cigar I smoked which was a Cohiba Siglo I.  I’ll keep it short, mainly because I only know what

Min Ron NEE tells me in his book An Illustrated Encyclopedia of Post-Revolution Havana Cigar.  The Siglo Series was introduced in 1992.  According

to MRN it is speculated that the line was created to fill the void left by the disconinuation of the Davidoff marca.  All of the Siglo line is

reportedly milder than your standard Cohiba.  There is actually an italicized note from MRN was alble to confirm with his Cuban consulatant on the

book that says he was ablr to confirm it is true that the line was created to fill that gap left by Davidoff.  I can say that while milder than a

Cohiba Robusto, the Siglo I is not a mild cigar.  I have never had the pleasure of a Cuban Davidoff, so I have no personal knowledge of how the

Siglos compare to the cigar they have replaced in the Habanos catalogue.  The Siglo I comes in cardboard packs of 5 or 10, in 3 packs of tubos, and

in varnished Slide Lid Boxes of 25 cigars.  The one I am smoking today was a gift from a very generous friend so I have no idea what type of

packaging it spent the first part of its life in.

Lets start off with appearance.  The Siglo I is a tres petite corona, or if you like to use the offical Habanos, S.A. factory names for the

vitolas, then you’d call it a perlas.  It measures a diminutive four inches in length and a thin 40 ring guage.  The wrapper is a little darker

than what I have seen on the standard Cohiba line and this specimine has a small water spot on the wrapper.  It sports a triple cap like all Cuban

parejos do.  A little bumpy and rustic looking, it seems well filled and exhibited a nice firm draw before I lit it.  With eagar anticipation I

used the “Three Match” technique to get this cigar lit.  The technique is much easier on smaller cigar like this than it is on a thicker robusto or

a long double corona.  A few puffs in and I immediately realized my mistake.  I decided to light this cigar up much too early.  There were moments

of harshness and a grassiness that told me this cigar could have used some time aging, probably a year or two to settle in.  You could definetly

see this cigars potential to be stellar though.  There was an underlying creaminess to it and perhaps some notes of roasted nuts complimented by a

vague hint of sweetness.  Those flavors only occasional came through as the more vegetal and grassy flavors of youth dominated the smoke.  I really

wish I had been more patient with this one.  I think once it has a chance to settle down this would be an very excellent medium bodied smoke.

Patience is a must though if you want to find that out.

‘Gar Tunes: Paris to Cuba by Mario Grigorov Monday, Jun 15 2009 

I recently had the opportunity to listen to a sampling of new music from the composer and musician Mario Grigorov.  His new album is called Paris to Cuba.  This is what Mario has to say about his inspiration for the album…

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Every time I go to Paris, I get inspired. I start thinking about ways I can embrace the city and absorb its magic…

This album takes me back to my time there, and I reflect on how I have always enjoyed traditional and classical French music – been intrigued by the use of melody and sultry textures.  I started playing with some melodies on the piano; inspired by the Parisian mood and architecture, I was trying to re-create the buildings I had seen that stood like frozen compositions. The compositions I began to write would soon lend themselves to a melding with the energy and simplicity of the music I also love from Cuba, along with all of its influences.

It’s not always easy to combine styles of music from their technical anatomies, but I was in no way trying to do that here.  This album, inspired by my appreciation of both styles, came about from the feel-good spirit that both Paris and Cuba share. I must admit, working with my good friend Melissa Newman brought it all together; she embodies the spirit and beauty of these musical cultures.  Her voice created the perfect accent for this project.

The four songs I had the opportunity to listen to were great. Two were instrumentals, “Cuban Soil, Cuban Sun” and “Ice Hotel”, with a decidedly Latin sound but with a “big band” jazz feel to them. The second two songs, “Every Little Movement” and “Snake Eyes” had female vocals that were were sultry and classic.  Those two songs sounded just like something you would hear in an old school smokey jazz club and they were a lot of fun to listen to. From what I have heard from this album, it is an excellent accompaniment to a relaxing evening sitting back with your favorite cigar and sipping rum. I would recommend checking it out especially if jazz with a Latin influence sounds like something you would enjoy.

Here is some more “official” information about the album and the artist… (more…)

Hoyo de Monterrey Le Hoyo du Roi Tuesday, Feb 17 2009 

Country: Cuba
Box Code: SUA JUN2000
Size: Corona 5.54″ x 42 ring

This cigar has a classic Cuban appearance and comes in a traditional presentation. Unbanded in a cedar cabinet of 25 cigars, the wrapper is light brown and silky looking with a few puckered veins running across its surface. It has a triple cap and once I clipped it I could see an expertly done bunching of the tobacco that mirrored what I saw in the foot. I was concerned that the draw might be a little tight and I was right but it was still manageable. I have found many of the Cuban cigars I have smoked to be  excellent smokes, but only after they have been aged properly do the begin to truly shine. With eight and a half years under its belt this cigar demonstrated why many cigar lovers consider Cuban cigars to be the best in the world.

The Le Hoyo du Roi starts off smooth and creamy with pronounced flavors of cafe au lait and wood. There are hints of black pepper and that Cuban earthiness that we all crave from a Habano. The pepper notes are subtle. It’s like the cigar wants you to know its there but it doesn’t want to overwhelm your palate, allowing you to enjoy all the subtitles it has to offer. The aroma is rich and decadent and the flavors have a chewiness to them that is simply fantastic. The smoke started off almost mild but continued to pickup as I progressed becoming a medium to almost full bodied smoke. It developed more spice but maintained its creamy/chewy characteristics. There were several flavors I picked up along the way that I couldn’t identify, subtle notes that weaved in and out making for an engaging and very enjoyable smoke. I am convinced that smoking a Habano while it’s young is such a waste. I have had the pleasure of a few aged Habanos over the years and they are always amazing smoking experiences and this cigar was no exception. The only negative thing I have to say about it is that the draw was just a bit too tight. I wish it were a bit looser making it a bit easier to smoke. The draw made me work a bit harder than I want to. I think that this was due to the fact that the cigar seemed over humidified.   It was too wet, so I hope some time in my cabinet at 62% to 65% RH will help the draw issue.

This du Roi was very reminiscent of a 1999 Hoyo du Prince I smoked last year which I’d rank as one of the best cigars I ever smoked. The 2000 du Roi ranks pretty high on my list as well now.  I feel like I have handed out more A+ ratings than usual lately but looking back over it, I have had the pleasure of some really stellar smokes recently.  There is just no way, even with the draw issue that I can score this any lower.  Everything else about this cigar was perfect and the flavors were out of this world.

Rating – A+

Bolivar Belicoso Fino Friday, Jul 11 2008 

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Country: Cuba
Year: Unknown

This cigar was given to me as a Christmas gift from a very generous friend of mine in Denmark. Bolivar is one of the more famous Cuban marcas and the Belicoso Fino one of its most popular sizes. I enjoyed this smoke while on vacation at the beach this week. It was a beautiful coastal Carolina evening as I sat on the screened in porch at my families condo. I wanted to make sure I enjoyed every aspect of this special cigar so I paired it with a cool bottle of water. Bolivars are among the strongest cigars the Island puts out. Here is a little blurb about the marca from Habanos, SA.

Simon Bolívar was one of the great historic figures of the 19th Century who liberated much of South America from Spanish rule.

The Bolívar brand was created in 1902 and is based today at the Partagas factory in the heart of Havana.

It is perhaps not surprising that a Habano named after such a powerful figure is blended to match his might. Bolívar is among the strongest, most full bodied of all Habanos. It boasts an unrivalled richness of flavour in its blend of Vuelta Abajo region tobaccos that makes it one of the most sought-after marques amongst experienced smokers.

The Bolivar Belicoso Fino is a handsome looking cigar. Wrapped in a light brown, leathery leaf it has some small veins running across the surface along with a slightly larger puckered vein that seems to be a trademark of a Cuban wrapper. The cigar is firm its entire length and has a nice heft to it. It seems to be packed full of tobacco. The cigar has a musty barnyard aroma. After clipping the head, a pre-light draw delivers a leathery flavor to the palate. The draw is excellent providing just the right amount of resistance.

The BBF, starts of a little mild and easy going, unusual for a Cuban Bolivar. It is woody with subtle notes of what I will call spiced fruit. I had a hard time coming up with a descriptor for the flavor and I’m not sure I have it right but that’s the best I could come up with. About half way through it begins to pack a bit of a punch. It is full bodied and robust. The woodiness takes on a distinct cedar flavor with a slightly sweet undertone to it. I picked up flashes of fruit and pepper as I made my way into the last third of the smoke. The finale continues to be a full and robust smoke with lots of earth and wood, and a strong spice on the finish. The Cuban “twang” that is often associated with cigars from the island was present throughout the smoke.

Although a full bodied cigar, the BBF is not as full or strong as other Bolivars I have tried. I think that this vitola is an excellent introduction to the marca for a smoker new to Cuban Bolivars. It is a wonderfully complex smoke with refined, well defined flavors. It is a good cigar for a special occasion, or any occasion.

Rating – A

The Cigar Spy recently smoked one of these.  Checkout his take on the Bolivar Belicoso Fino.

Fonseca No. 1 Tuesday, Oct 16 2007 

Country: Cuba
Box Date: September 2003
Size: Cazadores 63/8x44 ring

Fonseca is an under appreciated brand in my opinion. You don’t find too many people talking about it and there are plenty who haven’t even heard of it. I have found it to be a sort of hidden gem. Milder than most Cuban cigars it is still full of refined, complex flavors and they are a joy to smoke. The hallmark of the Fonseca is the white tissue paper wrapper that graces every stick in the marca, and the bold portrait of Francisco E. Fonseca that adorns each box.

The Cazadores is one of my most favorite vitolas. The No.1 sports a beautiful creamy brown wrapper covered in very fine veins and a handsome triple cap. The cap clipped off nicely and revealed the tell tale Cuban dimple underneath. This cigar starts off like a champ. Right off the bat it delivers smooth flavors of nuts and cream with a subtle saltiness. It is absolutely sublime. It produces thick clouds of creamy white smoke and rich almost nutty aroma. The finish lingers pleasantly with a salty spiciness that is unlike any other cigar I’ve smoked. As the smoke progresses the flavors begin to change. The predominate flavor is coffee and cream with a faint sweetness and occasional floral undertones. The construction on these cigars is flawless. With more than half the box smoked, I have never had a single issue of any kind with these cigars. The burn is razor sharp and the ash is perfectly formed and holds firm. I smoke these to the nub and almost burned my fingers as I finished this one up. It pained me more than the heat to put this cigar down.

Rating – A+

Partagas Serie P No. 2 – 6 1/8″ x 52 Wednesday, Aug 29 2007 

Country: Cuba
Box Code: ??

It’s been a while since I’ve had a cigar so I’m coming out gang-busters tonight. A very special cigar that was given to me by a good friend and fine BOTL. The Partagas Serie P No.2 was introduced in 2005 along with its cousin the Serie D No.4 Reserva. Partagas is one of the most famous and best selling Cuban marcas and is also know for having the widest range of lines and vitolas with a little bit of something for everyone. Partagas has cigars ranging from the mild to the full bodied powerhouse, but every one of them is reputed to have what is commonly referred to as “Partagas Spice”, a flavor profile that is the signature of the brand.

The PSP No.2 is a beautiful cigar with a smooth chocolate wrapper and a sublime earthy aroma. The first puff was a blast of harshness but it almost immediately changed to a smooth earthiness wrapped in classic Partagas spice. One thing that jumped out at me about this particular Partagas was that there was a creaminess to it I never experienced in other vitolas I’ve smoked with the exception of the much smaller Partagas Short. As the smoke progressed the Partagas Spice faded into the background and notes of caramel and nuts intermingled with its Cuban earthiness. It’s an amazingly complex smoke that demands your full attention. The cigar started to pickup again towards the end. It was all spice and earth the rest of the way. I rank this among one of the best Cuban cigars I have ever had the pleasure to smoke. The burn was good and the ash held firm but was a little papery on the edges. What a great cigar to have after an extended break from smoking.

Rating – A+

Montecristo No. 5 4×40 Friday, Dec 22 2006 

Country: Cuba
Box Code: Unknown

What a little flavor bomb! This is one of the most robust flavorful cigars I’ve smoked. It had an intense earthiness to it with cocoa on the finish. The burn was kind of all over the place, but it always corrected itself. It is amazing how much flavor is packed into this little cigar. I would say this is probably one of the best, if not the best, tres petite corona I’ve had. It is a fantastic quick smoke.

Ramon Allones Specially Selected 4 7/8 x 50 Friday, Jul 21 2006 

Country: Cuba
Box Code: Unknown

This was really a fantastic cigar. It is a beautiful cigar with a very smooth wrapper that was a nice light brown. The wrapper was a little lighter than most RASS I’ve seen, but I have seen a lot a variance in color with this particular cigar. It is a very full bodied and flavorful. It came on strong in the beginning with a bold peppery flavor very similar to a Camacho Corojo, but it evened out quickly. The pepper gave way to very full and decadent earth and nutty tones with a chocolate like finish. The flavors had a very creamy feel to them. Of course underneath it all was that unmistakable Cuban flavor and aroma. The bouquet of this cigar is amazing.

Partagas Short 4.25×42 Saturday, Apr 29 2006 

Country: Cuba
Box Code: SIH Feb 05

It’s my Birthday so I woke up this morning and went the coffee shop with the newspaper and a Paratgas Short out of my new wine cooler humidor (birthday present). It is a beautiful sunny morning. What perfect start to my 32nd.

This little cigar has blown me away. It has a beautiful creamy brown wrapper an is well filled, firm with no soft spots. Th cap clipped perfectly revealing that little Cuban dimple in the head. It took a light perfectly. Right off the bat this cigar comes alive. The best way to describe it is creamy and smooth. It has very pronounced flashes of vanilla and a coffee bean finish. It paired perfectly with my morning coffee. When you finish this cigar, it leaves you with an almost overwhelming desire to light up another. The burn was even and the ash held firmly to the cigar. I nubbed this thing, almost burning my lips. I just didn’t want to put it down. With just one year on these it is already a fantastic smoke, I almost can’t wait to see how good these babies get with some age on them. My biggest challenge is going to be keeping my hands off them so that I still have some left a year or two down the road. This cigar made me stop to think why it is I smoke anything else. I am convinced I am going to need to pick up a 50 cab of these.

It was a absolutely perfect start to my birthday.

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